"I don't know what is better than the work that is given to the actor – to teach the human heart the knowledge of itself."

~Lawrence Olivier

"I don't know what is better than the work that is given to the actor – to teach the human heart the knowledge of itself."

~Lawrence Olivier

"I don't know what is better than the work that is given to the actor – to teach the human heart the knowledge of itself."

~Lawrence Olivier

"Amy’s class is my therapy. I look forward to it every week. The way she allows us to feel all of our feelings and then shows us how to use those in our art is something I’ve never experienced in an acting class before. Thank you, Amy, for allowing me to feel safe enough to be my truest self."

Emily Gross
Scene Study

Hi, I'm Amy.

Having started out as an actor myself and then making the transition to casting, I am a long-time industry veteran. My life revolves around a passion for acting and the craft of storytelling. I grew up in a creative family where everyone had an artistic occupation.  I was raised with great respect for those who have chosen to pursue the craft of acting and am dedicated to helping my students find their most truthful and open selves.

In class, I approach acting as something that goes beyond just the page or the character. Acting is an artist's journey, and I often stress the importance of creating habits that will feed my students creatively in their performances and lives. Focus, willingness and availability to one's humanity are the most vital parts of acting and what creates a compelling piece of art. There's nothing I enjoy more than watching actors unfold into their full potential.

"Amy’s class is my therapy. I look forward to it every week. The way she allows us to feel all of our feelings and then shows us how to use those in our art is something I’ve never experienced in an acting class before. Thank you, Amy, for allowing me to feel safe enough to be my truest self."

Emily Gross
Scene Study

Hi, I'm Amy.

Having started out as an actor myself and then making the transition to casting, I am a long-time industry veteran. My life revolves around a passion for acting and the craft of storytelling. I grew up in a creative family where everyone had an artistic occupation.  I was raised with great respect for those who have chosen to pursue the craft of acting and am dedicated to helping my students find their most truthful and open selves.

In class, I approach acting as something that goes beyond just the page or the character. Acting is an artist's journey, and I often stress the importance of creating habits that will feed my students creatively in their performances and lives. Focus, willingness and availability to one's humanity are the most vital parts of acting and what creates a compelling piece of art. There's nothing I enjoy more than watching actors unfold into their full potential.

Hi, I'm Amy.

Having started out as an actor myself and then making the transition to casting, I am a long-time industry veteran. My life revolves around a passion for acting and the craft of storytelling. I grew up in a creative family where everyone had an artistic occupation.  I was raised with great respect for those who have chosen to pursue the craft of acting and am dedicated to helping my students find their most truthful and open selves.

In class, I approach acting as something that goes beyond just the page or the character. Acting is an artist's journey, and I often stress the importance of creating habits that will feed my students creatively in their performances and lives. Focus, willingness and availability to one's humanity are the most vital parts of acting and what creates a compelling piece of art. There's nothing I enjoy more than watching actors unfold into their full potential.


Interview with Amy

Why do you have a love affair with acting?
Acting is a way to connect to things beyond our reach. It provides understanding of other cultures and experiences. It makes us empathetic toward other walks of life, and we become more respectful toward each other. 

Stories really awaken things in us – stories about people, animals, relationships. Wars. You don’t even know yourself, in some ways, before you see a movie. You introduce yourself to yourself. It can really open up your idea of who you are. It’s amazing that a piece of acting can do that.

What are your goals for your students?
I want every student to have an understanding of how to celebrate themselves, how to share themselves, and how to work off another actor in the moment and not bullshit or manipulate. If you take my class, I want to wake you up to what you have to offer.

What kind of vibe do you create for your class?
I create a space that is nurturing, safe, honest. A place where you can fail and are taught to see how mistakes are sometimes the best thing you could ever do. That’s the difference between a true artist who runs with a mistake and someone who uses it to stop the whole scene. You want to be allowed to play in a high stakes environment. 

So I aim to create a safe environment but I’m also not going to blow sunshine up your ass. My students come to work and I respect them for that.

Why do you love old movies? 
The 70s was a great era for film. It was a time of incredible writing and really raw performances. I don’t know if we’ll ever see that many amazing American actors at the same time. It was impressive in terms of great filmmakers putting casts together that they used over and over again, like Scorcese and Coppola.

Also, there were a lot of character-driven pieces that were amazing showcases for actors. The films were slower with deeper meaning. I don’t think that people would sit through them anymore. But from an acting point of view, it’s a goldmine in study of how to carry a scene.

As an acting teacher, whose techniques do you draw from?
Meisner, Lee Strasberg, David Proval, Roy London, Stanislavski, Eric Morris and Rob Reece.

 

Interview with Amy

Why do you have a love affair with acting?
Acting is a way to connect to things beyond our reach. It provides understanding of other cultures and experiences. It makes us empathetic toward other walks of life, and we become more respectful toward each other. 

Stories really awaken things in us – stories about people, animals, relationships. Wars. You don’t even know yourself, in some ways, before you see a movie. You introduce yourself to yourself. It can really open up your idea of who you are. It’s amazing that a piece of acting can do that.

What are your goals for your students?
I want every student to have an understanding of how to celebrate themselves, how to share themselves, and how to work off another actor in the moment and not bullshit or manipulate. If you take my class, I want to wake you up to what you have to offer.

What kind of vibe do you create for your class?
I create a space that is nurturing, safe, honest. A place where you can fail and are taught to see how mistakes are sometimes the best thing you could ever do. That’s the difference between a true artist who runs with a mistake and someone who uses it to stop the whole scene. You want to be allowed to play in a high stakes environment. 

So I aim to create a safe environment but I’m also not going to blow sunshine up your ass. My students come to work and I respect them for that.

Why do you love old movies? 
The 70s was a great era for film. It was a time of incredible writing and really raw performances. I don’t know if we’ll ever see that many amazing American actors at the same time. It was impressive in terms of great filmmakers putting casts together that they used over and over again, like Scorcese and Coppola.

Also, there were a lot of character-driven pieces that were amazing showcases for actors. The films were slower with deeper meaning. I don’t think that people would sit through them anymore. But from an acting point of view, it’s a goldmine in study of how to carry a scene.

As an acting teacher, whose techniques do you draw from?
Meisner, Lee Strasberg, David Proval, Roy London, Stanislavski, Eric Morris and Rob Reece.


Interview with Amy

Why do you have a love affair with acting?
Acting is a way to connect to things beyond our reach. It provides understanding of other cultures and experiences. It makes us empathetic toward other walks of life, and we become more respectful toward each other. 

Stories really awaken things in us – stories about people, animals, relationships. Wars. You don’t even know yourself, in some ways, before you see a movie. You introduce yourself to yourself. It can really open up your idea of who you are. It’s amazing that a piece of acting can do that.

What are your goals for your students?
I want every student to have an understanding of how to celebrate themselves, how to share themselves, and how to work off another actor in the moment and not bullshit or manipulate. If you take my class, I want to wake you up to what you have to offer.

What kind of vibe do you create for your class?
I create a space that is nurturing, safe, honest. A place where you can fail and are taught to see how mistakes are sometimes the best thing you could ever do. That’s the difference between a true artist who runs with a mistake and someone who uses it to stop the whole scene. You want to be allowed to play in a high stakes environment. 

So I aim to create a safe environment but I’m also not going to blow sunshine up your ass. My students come to work and I respect them for that.

Why do you love old movies? 
The 70s was a great era for film. It was a time of incredible writing and really raw performances. I don’t know if we’ll ever see that many amazing American actors at the same time. It was impressive in terms of great filmmakers putting casts together that they used over and over again, like Scorcese and Coppola.

Also, there were a lot of character-driven pieces that were amazing showcases for actors. The films were slower with deeper meaning. I don’t think that people would sit through them anymore. But from an acting point of view, it’s a goldmine in study of how to carry a scene.

As an acting teacher, whose techniques do you draw from?
Meisner, Lee Strasberg, David Proval, Roy London, Stanislavski, Eric Morris and Rob Reece.


Hey look, I made you a nest so you can curl up in it and watch a clip from one of the greatest movies of all time. You're welcome!

Image
Hey look, I made you a nest so you can curl up in it and watch a clip from one of the greatest movies of all time. You're welcome!